• Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users
  • Checkered Eye users

The Checkered Eye Project

If you meet someone wearing a checkered eye,
it means they can't see well; they are somewhere on the blindness spectrum.

Creating kindness through a
glance.
The checkered eye is a
compassion cue, reminding
us to pause, connect, and
extend compassion to those
around us. Recognition of a
hidden need like low vision is
crucial to knowing how to
help if necessary. It also
adds some understanding
when a person's demeanor
is not the usual.

As symbols, the Checkered Eye and any style of white cane both indicate their user is on the blindness spectrum.

Most people who use a white cane have severe blindness, and use the cane as a tool for independent travel.

Some people use a white cane as a symbol, strictly to indicate to others that they have some degree of blindness. If a person has useful remaining eyesight, and doesn't need the cane as a tool, they may still choose to carry one to communicate their visual difficulties and increase their visibility in traffic.

People on the blindness spectrum who do not need the white cane as a travel or safety device, may choose to use a Checkered Eye to indicate that their vision is impaired.

The awareness of a person's hidden needs can alleviate confusion, frustration, and embarrassment, for people with blindness and those with whom they interact.

Please be aware of the existence of this emblem, and have a glance to see if anyone you encounter may be wearing one.

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